You've seen it. I've seen it. There's a sign out there that points you to a mysterious place in the Texas panhandle called, Panhanndle. It's not to be confused with Panhandle. No, that one only has one "n". This is something completely different.

At least I hope. It's either that or someone's legacy is a really embarrassing typo.

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Digging For Panhanndle In The Texas Panhandle Starts With The Railroad

It isn't easy to find any information regarding the lost city of Panhanndle, Texas. You really have to dig. Hours were spent combing through archives before the slightest hint of a trail was found.

The earliest mention of Panhanndle is in 1920. It's in something called the "Code of Rules (M.C.B.) Governing the Condition Of, And Repairs To, Freight And Passenger Cars."

Photo by Samuel Fyfe on Unsplash
Photo by Samuel Fyfe on Unsplash
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On page 200 it's there in black and white print...

Panhanndle & Santa Fe Railway Company.

God, An Emergency Flight, And Science. Was Panhanndle A Religious Settlement?

Panhanndle is mentioned again in 1979. This time it's in regards to a spiritual alliance. The reference is in the Summer & Spring edition of the "Family Of God Diary."

There's a story in the issue about a man by the name of Vern Grimsley, who was scheduled to speak in Amarillo one night. The next night he was scheduled to be in northern Nebraska.

The silhouette of a passenger plane flying in sunset.
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He should have fired his manager or agent. Whoever was handling routing for Vern messed up on this one. A man named Terry made an emergency flight to meet Vern, and together they left Amarillo at midnight to make the nut in Nebraska by 5 PM that evening.

On the page is a reference to an "Alliance Panhanndle Forum." It's in the first sentence of the article on the right. It's next to the picture of Vern.

Grimsley was known for his speeches concerning the ever growing links between psychology, science, philosophy, and religion. Perhaps Panhanndle had something to do with all of that.

Looking into it even further, you find that Vern was heavily involved with teachings regarding Urantia. Was Panhanndle a bastion for those exploring new ways of approaching science and religion as one? Could it have been a religious settlement of sorts?

Unfortunately, Panhanndle Is Nothing More Than A Silly Typo

There is no Panhanndle. It doesn't exist.

The "Panhanndle & Santa Fe Railway Company" was the Panhandle & Santa Fe Railway Company. The "Alliance Panhanndle Forum" was the Panhandle Forum. Just look at the headline above the typo if you didn't before.

Go to Google Maps and type in Panhanndle. The search comes up empty, and suggests trying Panhandle instead.

Someone got in a hurry when putting the sign together and misspelled Panhandle. What's funny is that the exact same typo has happened on more than one occasion. What are the odds?

At least whoever is responsible for the "Great Panhanndle Typo" didn't kill a tree.

10 Myths About Texas That Even Some Natives Believe

Everything's bigger in Texas, including the tall tales! Our state can seem pretty strange to people from far away, or even our immediate neighbors. There are several myths about Texas that range from quirky to fun and just plain ignorant and insulting, and even some people born and raised her believe 'em. Here are a few we can dispel today.

The Somewhat Small Towns of the Texas Panhandle

Say what now? Somewhat small?

That's right. These are the towns that seem massive when compared to teensy weensie two-stoplight towns like Pringle (30) or Kerrick (25), but they're definitely not on the same level as cities like White Deer or Panhandle....much less Amarillo.

Buckle up! We've got a places to go and towns to see! These populations are well over 100, but way less than 1000.

All aboard the Somewhat Small Texas Panhandle Towns tour!

LOOK: Texas Towns With Names From All Over the World

You can be a globetrotter....without ever crossing the Texas state line!

All you have to do is make sure you've got some gas money on hand and you can hit the highway to visit these not-so-exotic Texas towns!